AI, Estrogen, and Menopause

ai estrogen menopause Apr 12, 2023
Hormonal Imbalance

 

One of the biggest lies ever told by the Medical Establishment is that estrogen is bad for women, that it causes cancer, and that it should be kept low at all times. There is a general fear of estrogen that stems back generations if you ask anyone on the street, they would tell you that estrogen causes cancer. (Read my post entitled The Truth About Estrogen and Cancer ) I fell for this at the beginning of my career but eventually learned the truth with my own eyes. I have a unique perspective when it comes to estrogen on a few accounts that may shine a light on the truth about estrogen.

Over the past twenty years,  I have worked as a clinical hormone coach alongside hormone prescribers learning and watching what happens to the minds and bodies of women when they get enough estrogen and what happens when they get too little. In addition to this clinical bird’s eye view of patient experiences on adequately dosed estrogen, I was experiencing life for the first time on a healthy dose of estrogen myself.

Estrogen, come to find out, is a very predictable hormone that performs to varying degrees depending on how much of it is circulating in the blood.[1] [2] One thing I started very early in my hormone coaching career was monitoring the clinical responses and outcomes of the hormone replacement therapies women were prescribed. I noticed that women’s brains and bodies responded to varying degrees each time hormones were adjusted, especially estrogen. So much so that I started to monitor clinical indicators and blood hormone levels once every four months to watch the trends. Monitoring clinical indicators against blood serum hormone levels once every four months over two decades on several thousand patients has given me a lot of information.

Working in hormone medicine for so long, you hear all the stories about how bad estrogen is and how it should only be prescribed in low doses for the shortest amount of time. But the stories and warnings from my mentors and educators became confusing when what they were saying was not matching up with what I was witnessing in the hormone clinic. What I saw was that there are certain blood serum hormone levels where when obtained, women had a reduction or an elimination of cancer, depression, anxiety, weight gain, low energy, brain fog, well…you name it for the most part. I was blown away at, and still am, to see the impact having adequate levels of estrogen can do on the mind and body of women. I noticed when female patients kept estrogen levels low as recommended, they were riddled with mental illness diagnoses and physical decline issues. This led me to dig deeper into why everyone is saying that estrogen is bad when that’s not really the case. 

One of the biggest things that stood out to me in my years digging around the National Library of Medicine was the lack of studies on high-dose estrogen therapies or anything having to do with restoring and maintaining estrogen at healthy reproductive levels. When I began to learn about artificial intelligence a few years back at the American Academy of Ant-Aging Medicine, they presented it as a tool and savior for doctors and modern medicine. That doctors wouldn’t need to think for themselves anymore and that they could just use IBM’s Watson or some other form of AI to do their job and all would be okay. I found this entire concept very disturbing because the information AI spits out has been obtained from sources who do not have all the information or biased information.

I recently heard about OpenAI and ChatGPT and got curious about how to use them. For fun, I asked it a question and was somewhat impressed at my conversational experience, but also rather disappointed at the future of hormone medicine for women. Below is the transcription of that conversation.

Me

What causes menopause?

AI

Menopause is a natural biological process that occurs in women as they age, typically between the ages of 45 and 55. It marks the end of a woman's reproductive years and is defined as the point at which a woman has not had a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months.

Menopause is caused by a decrease in the production of certain hormones, particularly estrogen, and progesterone, by the ovaries.[3] As women age, their ovaries become less responsive to hormones from the pituitary gland, which can lead to irregular menstrual cycles and eventually, cessation of menstruation.

While menopause is a natural part of the aging process for women, it can also be caused by certain medical treatments or conditions, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgical removal of the ovaries. Additionally, some women may experience early menopause due to genetic factors, autoimmune disorders, or other medical conditions.

Me

Can menopause be prevented?

AI

No, menopause cannot be prevented. Menopause is a natural process that occurs as women age, and it marks the end of a woman's reproductive years. However, there are steps that women can take to manage the symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, night sweats, and mood changes.

Women can work with their healthcare provider to develop a treatment plan that may include hormone replacement therapy, which can help relieve some of the symptoms of menopause. Other options may include lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and getting enough sleep.

It is important for women to speak with their healthcare provider about their individual risk factors for menopause, as well as any concerns they may have about managing the symptoms of menopause.

Me

If menopause is caused by a decrease in estrogen and progesterone,[4] wouldn't it make sense to restore those hormones back to healthy levels so women wouldn't need to experience menopause or the side effects of it at all?

AI

While it may seem logical to restore estrogen and progesterone levels to prevent menopause or its symptoms, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is not recommended for all women. HRT is a treatment that involves taking estrogen and sometimes progesterone to replace the hormones that are no longer being produced by the ovaries.

While HRT can effectively relieve symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, night sweats, and vaginal dryness, it is not without risks. HRT has been associated with an increased risk of blood clots, stroke, and breast cancer in some women. As a result, it is recommended that women discuss the potential risks and benefits of HRT with their healthcare provider to determine if it is the right choice for them.

Additionally, menopause is a natural process and an important part of a woman's life cycle. While it can be challenging for some women, it is a normal and healthy part of aging. There are many other options available for managing the symptoms of menopause, including lifestyle changes and non-hormonal treatments, so women can find a plan that works best for them.

Me

I have never been able to find those studies many say that high-dose estrogen therapy causes an increased risk of blood clots, stroke, and cancer. Most studies show that it is estrogen deficiency that causes women to be at greater risk for those conditions.[5] It is women with low estrogen levels that are susceptible to cancer, not women with plenty of circulating estrogen. Don't you have data on the average age of a woman who gets cancer and where her estrogen level is? Or data that show how women who maintain a certain level of estrogen are absent of the mental and physical diseases that women get when estrogen is deficient?

AI

There is some evidence to suggest that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may increase the risk of blood clots, stroke, and breast cancer in some women. While it is true that estrogen deficiency can increase the risk of certain health conditions, including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive decline, the risks and benefits of HRT need to be carefully weighed on a case-by-case basis.

The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, which was one of the largest clinical trials on HRT, found that the use of combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, stroke, and blood clots. However, it is important to note that the study looked at the use of HRT in women who were over the age of 60 and had been using HRT for an extended period of time. The risks of HRT may be different for women who start using it at an earlier age or for a shorter period of time.

While there is some evidence to suggest that HRT may increase the risk of certain health conditions, it is also an effective treatment for relieving the symptoms of menopause. As a result, women should discuss the potential risks and benefits of HRT with their healthcare provider to determine if it is the right choice for them. Additionally, there are many other options available for managing the symptoms of menopause, including lifestyle changes and non-hormonal treatments, so women can find a plan that works best for them.

Me

The WHI study used low-dosed estrogen therapies and the study did not conclude that estrogen caused cancer. That study has been debunked many times for many reasons. If you are going by the WHI study then it would suggest that using low-dosed estrogen HRT would be the culprit by keeping one in a state of estrogen deficiency. Continuing to use that study as a way to scare doctors away from prescribing estrogen and terrifying women who want to take estrogen is doing a large disservice to female mankind. This way of medicine keeps women's hormones much too low so drugs and procedures can be sold to manage the symptoms that otherwise would not exist if estrogen were properly restored.

AI

Thank you for your perspective. It is true that the findings of the WHI study have been subject to debate and criticism, and that there is an ongoing discussion in the medical community regarding the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for women going through menopause.

While there is evidence to suggest that estrogen deficiency can increase the risk of certain health conditions, including osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, the use of HRT is a decision that should be made on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the individual's medical history, current health status, and preferences.

It is important for women to have open and honest conversations with their healthcare providers about the risks and benefits of HRT, as well as other treatment options for managing the symptoms of menopause. This way, women can make informed decisions about their health and well-being.

Me

How can women make informed medical decisions if the Medical Establishment uses studies like the WHI to keep women estrogen deficient and doctors ignorant on how to properly restore it to prevent and reverse diseases of all kinds? Doctors are left in the dark or lied to about estrogen and women are suffering because of it. This does not seem reasonable to me.

AI

It is important for women to be informed about the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and to have open and honest conversations with their healthcare providers about their individual health concerns and preferences.

While there is ongoing debate and controversy regarding the use of HRT, there is also a growing body of research suggesting that the benefits of HRT may outweigh the risks for some women, particularly when it is started at the onset of menopause and used for a limited duration.

It is important for healthcare providers to stay up-to-date on the latest research and guidelines related to menopause management and HRT, and to be open to discussing all available treatment options with their patients. Additionally, women can seek out healthcare providers who specialize in menopause management and who are knowledgeable about the latest research and treatment options.

Ultimately, the decision to use HRT or any other treatment for managing menopause symptoms should be based on an individual's medical history, current health status, and preferences, and made in collaboration with a trusted healthcare provider.

Me

How can healthcare providers stay up to date on the latest research and guidelines if all the data is not present? There are no studies in the National Library of Medicine (NLM) on high-dose estrogen therapies. All studies in the NLM on estrogen use low-dose therapies. And the dosing guidelines are those to manage the symptoms of estrogen deficiency that otherwise would not exist if estrogen were fully restored, no matter how old a woman is. Women’s brains and bodies require more estrogen than what the guidelines recommend. What is a woman supposed to do? And what are doctors supposed to do if they are not taught how to fully restore main-sex hormones not only in women but in men as well?

AI

Staying up-to-date with the latest research and guidelines related to menopause management and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can be a challenge, as new studies and guidelines are published regularly. However, healthcare providers can access and stay informed about the latest research and guidelines through a variety of resources, such as medical journals, conferences, online courses, and professional associations.

Additionally, healthcare providers can seek out opportunities for continuing education and training in menopause management and HRT. They can also consult with colleagues who specialize in menopause management or seek out second opinions when appropriate.

Regarding high-dose estrogen therapies, while there may be limited studies specifically on high-dose therapies, healthcare providers can still use the available evidence on lower-dose therapies to inform their decisions on dosing and treatment options. Additionally, healthcare providers can monitor patients carefully and adjust treatment as needed based on individual responses and symptoms.

It is important to note that the goal of menopause management and HRT is not to fully restore estrogen to premenopausal levels, but rather to alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life while minimizing risks. The decision to use HRT or any other treatment should be based on individual factors, including medical history, current health status, and personal preferences, and made in collaboration with a trusted healthcare provider.

Me

As a woman, why would I want to manage the symptoms of menopause if I can get rid of it and the side effects of it with proper estrogen and progesterone restoration? Why would a woman want to spend the rest of her life managing mental and physical misery when she doesn’t have to?

Menopause is like living like the walking dead. There is no quality of life in menopause. The only way to not experience menopause or its side effects is to restore estrogen and progesterone to reproductive levels. There are a multitude of studies that suggest the health of the menstrual cycle is an indicator of a woman's overall health. Why not restore a menstrual cycle so I don't have to fall apart mentally and physically? A regular and incident-free menstrual cycle is a small price to pay for mental and physical freedom, to say the least.

AI

While estrogen and progesterone restoration can alleviate many of the symptoms of menopause and improve the quality of life for some women, it is important to note that restoring hormone levels to premenopausal levels may not be appropriate or necessary for all women.

Menopause is a natural transition that occurs in all women as they age, and while it can be accompanied by uncomfortable symptoms, it is not a disease that needs to be cured.

Additionally, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) carries its own risks and potential side effects, which must be weighed against the benefits.

The decision to use HRT or any other treatment for managing menopause symptoms should be based on an individual's medical history, current health status, and preferences, and made in collaboration with a trusted healthcare provider. It is also important to consider non-hormonal treatments and lifestyle changes that can help manage menopause symptoms, such as exercise, stress reduction, and a healthy diet.

Regarding the menstrual cycle, while it is true that irregularities or abnormalities in the menstrual cycle can be indicators of underlying health issues, restoring a regular menstrual cycle solely for the purpose of avoiding menopause symptoms may not be necessary or appropriate for all women. Again, the decision to use any treatment or approach should be based on individual factors and made in collaboration with a healthcare provider.

Me

Most women feel better when they can maintain estrogen and progesterone at levels that allow them to have a regular menstrual cycle. Whoever says that menopause is not a disease to be cured is mistaken.[6]They clearly have not had the clinical experience to see for themselves what happens to women when they get enough estrogen and when they have too little. If I can see it with my own eyes why is it so difficult to find information about it?

There is a growing population of women who are reversing and preventing menopause and perimenopause by way of restoring estrogen and progesterone, including myself. Again, healthcare providers are clueless about estrogen and how to properly restore it for the reason of perpetually keeping women mentally and physically ill. This seems to be the real issue here. As long as women are mentally and physically ill due to main sex hormone deficiency, then they are more easily controlled with drugs and other profit-driven procedures. There are very few profits to be made off a hormonally balanced woman.

AI

It is important to note that menopause is a natural transition that all women go through as they age, and it is not a disease to be cured. However, menopause can come with a range of uncomfortable symptoms that can have a negative impact on quality of life. Restoring estrogen and progesterone levels through hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may be a viable option for some women to alleviate these symptoms, but it is important to carefully weigh the potential benefits and risks with a healthcare provider.

While there are women who choose to reverse or prevent menopause through hormone restoration, this approach is not appropriate or necessary for all women. Hormone restoration carries its own risks and potential side effects, and the decision to use HRT or any other treatment should be made in collaboration with a healthcare provider based on individual medical history and health status.

It is also important to consider non-hormonal treatments and lifestyle changes that can help manage menopause symptoms, such as exercise, stress reduction, and a healthy diet. The decision to use any treatment or approach should be based on individual factors and made in collaboration with a healthcare provider.

Me

Why would I want to manage the symptoms of menopause if I can get rid of it altogether?

AI

While it is possible to alleviate menopause symptoms through hormone replacement therapy (HRT), it is important to remember that menopause is a natural biological process that all women experience as they age. It is not a disease to be cured, but rather a transition in life.

It is also important to consider the potential risks and side effects of HRT, such as an increased risk of blood clots, stroke, and breast cancer. Hormone restoration should not be taken lightly, and the decision to use HRT or any other treatment approach should be made in collaboration with a healthcare provider based on individual medical history and health status.

Additionally, not all women experience severe or debilitating menopause symptoms, and many are able to manage their symptoms effectively through lifestyle changes and non-hormonal treatments. It is important to consider all options and make an informed decision based on individual factors and preferences.

Me

That is incorrect. Most women do experience severe and debilitating symptoms of estrogen deficiency including menopause. I'm not sure where you are getting your information but the next time you come across a menopausal woman, ask her how she feels.

AI

I apologize if my previous response did not accurately reflect the experiences of many menopausal women. It is true that many women experience significant symptoms during menopause, including hot flashes, night sweats, mood changes, and vaginal dryness, among others. These symptoms can certainly have a significant impact on quality of life.

However, it is also important to acknowledge that not all women experience these symptoms to the same degree, and some women may not experience them at all. In addition, there are a variety of treatment options available to help manage menopause symptoms, including hormone replacement therapy, non-hormonal medications, and lifestyle changes.

Ultimately, the decision to manage or alleviate menopause symptoms is a personal one that should be based on individual preferences, health history, and the advice of a healthcare provider.

Me

It appears as though the Medical Establishment profits off of keeping women estrogen deficient.

There are thousands of studies that point to estrogen deficiency as the cause, directly or indirectly, of most mental illness diagnoses in women such as depression, anxiety, headaches, migraines, painful periods, mood swings, insomnia, low energy, brain fog, cognition issues, low self-esteem, low libido, anger outbursts, lack of will to live, malcontent, behavioral issues, etc.[7] If estrogen deficiency is related to these conditions, including the health of the menstrual cycle, why aren't women offered estrogen in adequate doses that would ultimately eliminate or significantly reduce them?

AI

It is important to note that healthcare providers strive to provide the best possible care for their patients, and decisions regarding treatment are based on a variety of factors, including patient preferences, individual health histories, and the latest scientific evidence. While estrogen deficiency has been associated with a range of symptoms and health conditions, the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is not always the best or most appropriate treatment option for every woman.

There are risks associated with HRT, including an increased risk of blood clots, stroke, and certain types of cancer. These risks must be weighed against the potential benefits of treatment, and decisions regarding HRT use should be made on a case-by-case basis.

Furthermore, while estrogen deficiency may be a contributing factor in some mental health conditions, it is not the sole cause. Mental health is a complex issue that can be influenced by a wide range of factors, including genetics, environmental factors, and life experiences. Effective treatment often requires a comprehensive, individualized approach that addresses all relevant factors.

Ultimately, the decision to use estrogen replacement therapy should be made in consultation with a qualified healthcare provider who can provide individualized guidance based on a thorough understanding of the patient's unique needs and health history.

Me

But healthcare providers are not educated or trained in adequate dosed estrogen therapies intentionally. How can they make medical recommendations about estrogen if they don't have access to all the data or are trained on how to properly restore it? Your information about an increased risk of blood clots, strokes, and cancer is inaccurate. Women are more susceptible to those diseases the longer their circulating estrogen remains suboptimal, not when they have enough of it.

My problem with AI is what I thought would happen when I first listened to Watson a couple of years ago at an A4M conference to give a lecture on the future of AI. The only information that AI is able to offer is based on limited and biased data. Not all information about estrogen or how to clinically restore it is available to doctors or the public.

How about we expose all the data, including data on high-dose estrogen therapies; and teach doctors how to effectively and sustainably restore female hormones so women never have to live another day fighting the mental and physical anguish hormone deficiency brings? Is that too much to ask?

AI

As an AI language model, my responses are based on data and information available in the National Library of Medicine, medical journals, and other reliable sources. While there may be ongoing debates and controversies in the medical community regarding the use of high-dose estrogen therapies, it is important for healthcare providers to stay up to date on the latest research and guidelines in order to make informed decisions regarding patient care.

It is also important for patients to have open and honest discussions with their healthcare providers about their concerns and treatment options. Ultimately, the decision to use high-dose estrogen therapies should be based on a careful consideration of the risks and benefits for each individual patient.

Me

That's my point, your responses are based on data and information available in the National Library of Medicine, medical journals, and other "reliable sources". "Reliable resources", do you mean the pharmaceutical industry?

I understand that high-dose estrogen therapy clinical trials are not allowed by the FDA. I also know that any results of high-dose estrogen studies are not allowed in the National Library of Medicine or medical journals. Why do you think that is? Is it because the results go against the narrative of the disease management model of conventional medicine?

There would be very few mental illnesses and physical malfunctions in women if estrogen were properly restored. It would change the world as we know it. What kind of world do you think it would be if most women felt good most of the time for no real good reason?

Most women have never lived one day with enough estrogen. It doesn't take long to see the clinical effects of what happens to the mind and body of a woman when she fully restores her estrogen. Estrogen, if there is enough of it running in the blood, is disease protective. When it remains too low for too long, the brain and body malfunction and become prone to diseases. Keeping this information out of the National Library of Medicine prevents AI from giving ALL the information to the public. This approach keeps women fat, tired, crazy, and in continuous need of a slew of drugs (recreational and prescribed) just to feel like they don't want to die every day.

AI

As an AI language model, I am not biased toward any industry or source of information. My responses are based on a wide range of data and information from various sources, including medical journals, government health organizations, and academic institutions. I do not promote any specific treatment or medication, and I always encourage individuals to consult with their healthcare providers before making any medical decisions. 

Regarding your concerns about the availability of high-dose estrogen therapy studies, it is important to note that the FDA has stringent guidelines in place for clinical trials to ensure the safety and efficacy of any new treatment. While high-dose estrogen therapy may have potential benefits, it is crucial to thoroughly evaluate any potential risks before making it available for widespread use. As new research becomes available, it is important for healthcare providers to stay up-to-date and consider all available options for their patients.

Me

How many more years do women need to wait to get good data on adequately dosed estrogen therapies? It's the year 2023. Do you mean to tell me you cannot get this data? It's not like we're trying to get a man to the moon. Estrogen has been around for a while. We should not be saying we need more information in this day and age. The information is available, it's just not made available. There is a reason that data on high-dose estrogen therapy has been withheld from the public and doctors left in the dark on how to sustainably restore it. Several industries would become obsolete if women weren’t suffering from hormone deficiencies.

All medical information needs to be exposed, not just the data that benefit Big Pharma. You don't know it, (maybe you do) but you are being used as a pawn by the pharmaceutical industry to give out false information about estrogen. And it's women that are paying the price of your misinformation mentally, physically, emotionally, behaviorally, and financially.

AI

As an AI language model, I do not have a bias towards any particular industry or agenda, including the pharmaceutical industry. My responses are based on the information and data available to me, including studies published in medical journals and information from reliable sources such as the National Library of Medicine.

It is important for healthcare providers to have access to all relevant information and studies to make informed decisions about patient care. However, the process of conducting clinical trials and studies can be time-consuming and expensive, and there are also ethical considerations involved. It is important for researchers and healthcare providers to continue to seek out and evaluate new information and therapies, while also being cautious about potential risks and side effects.

Me

Don't you think it is worth the time, money, and risk for the world to see once and for all how women respond to adequate doses of estrogen given how badly they feel mentally and physically without it? At what point will this be important enough?

AI

! Something went wrong. If this issue persists please contact us through our help center at help.openai.com.

…..

I’m not sure what happened to make the AI bot stop working. Maybe it didn’t have an answer. Maybe I annoyed it. Regardless, you get the jest. Estrogen is to be kept low at all times due to possible cancer and not enough information. But still not really sure so let’s keep estrogen low anyway. And no plans to find out the mental and physical benefits of high-dose estrogen therapies.

The AI bot sounds like any doctor a woman goes to see for hormone therapy. The dialog is the same. The responses are the same. Everybody is quoting the WHI as if it had merit being held as the gold standard of hormone care for all women. What a joke. Conventional doctors are like little AI bots repeating studies they have never read and certainly not speaking from clinical experience. For those of you women who are frustrated at your doctor for lacking in the hormone-balancing arena, there is a reason for it and it is intentional, but not necessarily their fault.

The future of hormone medicine for women does not look good unless something is done about it. Women need to demand information about adequately dosed estrogen and progesterone protocols and require doctors to be trained on how to effectively and sustainably prescribe them. The estrogen lie has gone on long enough.

 .....

If you are a woman struggling to obtain optimal hormonal balance, the best thing you can do for yourself is to work with someone who has been successfully balancing hormones for women for years; someone who knows what they are doing. I encourage you to take control of your own hormone health and participate in my signature hormone balancing program Balance Your Hormones. I can help you balance your hormones to the Hormone Sweet Spot and keep them balanced so you may never have to experience the mental illnesses and physical diseases estrogen-deficient women are susceptible to.

And isn't it about time you felt good most of the time for no real good reason?

 

 


Reference:

[1] Drisko JA. "Natural" isomolecular hormone replacement: an evidence-based medicine approach. Int J Pharm Compd. 2000 Nov-Dec;4(6):414-20

[2] Hiroi R, Weyrich G, Koebele SV, Mennenga SE, Talboom JS, Hewitt LT, Lavery CN, Mendoza P, Jordan A, Bimonte-Nelson HA. Benefits of Hormone Therapy Estrogens Depend on Estrogen Type: 17β-Estradiol and Conjugated Equine Estrogens Have Differential Effects on Cognitive, Anxiety-Like, and Depressive-Like Behaviors and Increase Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 mRNA Levels in Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Subregions. Front Neurosci. 2016 Dec 8;10:517

[3] Wilson RA, Brevetti RE, Wilson TA. Specific procedures for the elimination of the menopause. West J Surg Obstet Gynecol. 1963;71:110-21.

[4] Burger HG. The endocrinology of the menopause. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 1999 Apr-Jun;69(1-6):31-5. doi: 10.1016/s0960-0760(98)00145-9. 

[5] Lizcano F, Guzmán G. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause. Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:757461. 

[6] Rhodes FP. The Menopause, A Deficiency Disease. Mich Med. 1965 Jun;64:410-2.

[7] Lizcano F, Guzmán G. Estrogen Deficiency and the Origin of Obesity during Menopause. Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:757461

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras sed sapien quam. Sed dapibus est id enim facilisis, at posuere turpis adipiscing. Quisque sit amet dui dui.
Call To Action

Stay connected with news and updates!

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.
Don't worry, your information will not be shared.

We hate SPAM. We will never sell your information, for any reason.